Deep Sky Astrophotography by Barry Wilson

Current Projects: (1) NGC1333; (2) NGC2264 The Cone and Fox Fur Nebulae

(1) NGC1333

NGC 1333 - A mysterious powerhouse of star formation, as APOD describes: "NGC 1333 is seen in visible light as a reflection nebula, dominated by bluish hues characteristic of starlight reflected by dust. A mere 1,000 light-years distant toward the heroic constellation Perseus, it lies at the edge of a large, star-forming molecular cloud. This striking close-up view spans about two full moons on the sky or just over 15 light-years at the estimated distance of NGC 1333. It shows details of the dusty region along with hints of contrasting red emission from Herbig-Haro objects, jets and shocked glowing gas emanating from recently formed stars. In fact, NGC 1333 contains hundreds of stars less than a million years old, most still hidden from optical telescopes by the pervasive stardust. The chaotic environment may be similar to one in which our own Sun formed over 4.5 billion years ago." A deep image of this target has been a goal for some time and with e-Eye's dark skies Steve and I have realised our goal with our shared remote rig. This image is a fine test for the TEC140 and QSI690 at 0.75"/px. This image has only edges cropped from dithering.

TEC140 at F7; 10 Micron GM2000HPS II UP; QSI690wsg-8; Astrodon filters; Lum 57 x 600s; 24 x 600s each RGB; 21.5 hrs total integration. E-Eye Extremadura, Spain. January 2019.

Data acquisition: Barry Wilson & Steve Milne. Processing: Barry Wilson

(2) NGC2264 The Cone & Fox Fur Nebulae

From Wikipedia: "The Cone Nebula is an H II region in the constellation of Monoceros. It was discovered by William Herschel on December 26, 1785, at which time he designated it H V.27. The nebula is located about 830 parsecs or 2,700 light-years away from Earth. The Cone Nebula forms part of the nebulosity surrounding the Christmas Tree Cluster. The designation of NGC 2264 in the New General Catalogue refers to both objects and not the nebula alone. The diffuse Cone Nebula, so named because of its apparent shape, lies in the southern part of NGC 2264, the northern part being the magnitude-3.9 Christmas Tree Cluster. It is in the northern part of Monoceros, just north of the midpoint of a line from Procyon to Betelgeuse. The cone's shape comes from a dark absorption nebula consisting of cold molecular hydrogen and dust in front of a faint emission nebula containing hydrogen ionized by S Monocerotis, the brightest star of NGC 2264. The faint nebula is approximately seven light-years long (with an apparent length of 10 arcminutes), and is 2,700 light-years away from Earth." This image has been a delight to process and much simpler than my last image of the 4 panel mosaaic of IC59-63. I do particularly enjoy the wonderful 'texture' of the Fox Fur and the delicate blushing orange/yellow reflection nebula seemingly floating above the Cone. The bright blue stars of course needed some taming and careful care when combining the Ha to avoid excessive ringing.

TEC140 at F7; 10 Micron GM2000HPS II UP; QSI690wsg-8; Astrodon filters; Ha 23 x 1200s; Lum 48 x 600s; 24 x 600s each RGB; 28 hrs total integration. E-Eye Extremadura, Spain. January 2019.

Data acquisition: Barry Wilson & Steve Milne. Processing: Barry Wilson


ABOUT ME

I have been fascinated with astronomy since childhood ever since I read Patrick Moore's "The Observer's Book of Astronomy" and became a devotee of BBC's "The Sky at Night". This website aims to display what can be achieved by an amateur astrophotographer in their backgarden - Totnes, Devon, UK, in my case - equiped with dedication, patience and perseverance, especially from my family!  I also share a remote observatory in Spain with Steve Milne, equiped with all of our equipment, setup by ourselves and jointly operated and controlled.

Clear Skies!

Barry Wilson


© Barry Wilson 2018.

All images on this website are not to be reproduced or used without permission.


Nebulae images

IC447 in Monoceros

IC447 in Monoceros

The beautiful reflection nebula IC447 in Monoceros. I've shunned a moody rendition to celebrate the glorious colour and variety across the composition.